Category Archives: transit geeks

Follow me on Twitter!

I have a new Twitter account strictly for planning/transportation issues. It is @carfree21.

Feel free to follow my feed and get links to articles I find interesting about planning and policy developments around the world!

Check out who I’m following for other progressive planners, more articles, more comments and more awesome!

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Car Free Adventure to Staten Island

It is definitely summer in New York City. I decided to cool off a bit from the urban heat island that is known as Manhattan and headed to Staten Island, the oft-forgotten borough of New York City. I took the subway to the new South Ferry Station, which is totally fabulous. I would have gotten photos except the MTA police did not look too happy at the sight of my camera, and I saw no need to get arrested or detained for taking photos in the subway.

A quick walk over to the ferry terminal, and we’re off! I forgot that I lack sea legs, so I was a little shaky on the trip over because of the rocking of the ferry. I got a few great photos of the Statue of Liberty; saw the bridges – the Brooklyn, Verrazano-Narrows,  Manhattan and Goethals; and even caught a few pigeons hitching a ride to Staten Island with us.

The Staten Island Railway is one of the oldest continuously used rail corridors in the United States, so it was a treat to finally ride it. I rode the entire length of the Railway, through neighborhoods of all types – industrial, residential and commercial. Staten Island, at least from the windows of the subway car, looks remarkably like New Jersey. Very suburban and low density. I wasn’t expecting high rise towers like Manhattan, but I was thinking there’d be more dense development around the railway stations than I actually saw. Despite its name, the SIR does not use commuter rail cars – instead, they use modified R44 subway cars. The trains are shorter and some stops are flag stops only.

After riding for over 40 minutes, arriving in Tottenville was a treat. There wasn’t much to see the further south we traveled, but I wanted to switch sides on the train and see another view of the island. One fascinating thing about the Staten Island Railway is that there are no fares between most stations on Staten Island, so there are no ticket booths or Metrocard machines. People can just walk up, hop on and ride to their destination. It reminded me of “Choose your own fares!” – how much do people value the Railway but would pay if it were optional to pay, and how many would simply continue using the system without paying? To transfer from the ferry (which is free) to the Railway at St. George Station, you must pay the regular subway fare of $2.25 or swipe your unlimited MetroCard (and vice versa).

I did wonder about parking, since I know many people use the Railway to connect to the ferry service to lower Manhattan. Where in the world to they park? I didn’t see a lot of huge parking lots or decks. Perhaps people take buses to the Railway or those who commute by Railway live within walking distance of the stations.

In the end, my adventure was 3 hours long but worth the views of the city from the ferry, and didn’t cost me a dime since I already paid for the unlimited Metrocard.

World Carfree Day – September 22

carfree

World Carfree Day is September 22. Do you have any special plans? If so, add your event online at: World Carfree Day And join the World Carfree Day Page on Facebook!

World Carfree Day is an annual celebration of cities and public life, free from the noise, stress and pollution of cars. Each year on September 22, people around the world organize events of all sizes to showcase alternatives to the automobile. World Carfree Network invites organisations and individuals everywhere to join!

Every September 22, people from around the world get together in the streets, intersections, and neighbourhood blocks to remind the world that we don’t have to accept our car-dominated society. 2009 should be no different.

Transit Conflicts in Harlem

As promised, I got a few photos of transit conflicts in Harlem. (Update: I define conflicts as either structural or aestethic issues and pedestrian-bicyclist-motorized vehicle conflicts.), I will be going out again this week to take more photos. I think this set is very representative of the types of transit issues that happen in Harlem on a daily basis.

Transit Conflicts

Let me know if there’s a particular thing you’d like to see or whether you agree or disagree on some of these conflicts.

Send me Transit Maps

Sleeping on the Subway
Photo by giopuo

Since I’m still on the job hunt, I can’t visit cities across the US (and world) to get my own transit maps. So, I am asking you, dear readers, to send me transit maps from the cities where you live. Yeah, I know I can look up maps online, but I want to stick them up on my walls in my lovely 7 1/2 by 11 bedroom here in NYC.

Send transit maps to me:

E. Jemison
P.O. Box 2098
New York, NY 10027

If you want me to send you a NYC Subway map or bus map, include a note on whether you want either map or both, and a self addressed, pre-stamped envelope. You’ll need to send one of those large brown envelopes since the maps are large. I’ll mail out maps upon request. Priority mail is $4.95.

I’ll also take a photo of the transit map and give you a special shout-out here on Living Car Free!

PS: I’m still trying to figure out how to get a full size map of the NJ Transit system map. Any geeks who know, please reply in the comments!

Where do you get your public transit directions?

Just incredibly curious…

National Train Day 2009 (Photos)

While I am a transit fan through and through, I figured that it couldn’t hurt to attend National Train Day 2009 and see what all the hype is about. I got so many emails, tweets and saw so many ads about National Train Day! I was totally hyped – got up at 430am to catch the 527 NE Corridor to NYC, then hopped on BoltBus to Washington, DC, where the biggest festivities seemed to be being held.

Once I arrived in DC, I walked to the Red Line and took it over to Union Station. I would have walked the approximately 20 minute walk from the bus stop, but it was hot and humid in DC!

Union Station was PACKED with people, exhibits and Amtrak employees. I got as many pictures as I could, and waited an hour in line to tour an Acela high speed train. The enthusiasm of the crowds was contagious! I soon forgot that my feet hurt, it was hot inside Union Station, too and that the lines to see exhibits were long.

See my photos from National Train Day 2009:

NTD2009

Did you attend in your city? Or were you in DC, too? I’d love to hear from you in the comments!